Tag Archives: aliens

Reading the Rainbow: Swipe Right for Murder (ARC), Earth to Charlie, When It All Falls Down

Thank you to NetGalley and Little, Brown and Company for sending me a free advanced reader copy of Swipe Right for Murder for an honest review. Swipe Right for Murder debuted August 6th.

For full disclosure, I am friends with the author of When It All Falls Down, and she gifted me a copy of the book!

The stars have aligned: of the last few books I’ve read, three in a row had a strong coming-of-age focus on homosexuality! So I thought I would throw together a post of mini-reviews for each book; all three were fun to read!

First up is Earth to Charlie. This was one of those books that I picked up in a random buy-a-thon in Barnes and Noble. The blurb called to me: aliens in Montana? I’m writing a book about aliens in Montana, so this was basically required reading!

Slight spoiler, but I think you really ought to know this heading into the book: in the end, Earth to Charlie turned out to be much more of a contemporary book than anything approaching sci-fi. That was a bit of a disappointment to me; it’s not the first time this year that I’ve been teased with YA aliens, only for the author to not follow through. But nevertheless, I finished this book within one sitting, which should speak for itself in terms of the easy readability of this book. It’s a comfy page turner, with a small cast and a cozy, small town setting. I’m still searching for YA aliens, but I’ll recommend Earth to Charlie to fans of contemporary coming-of-age fiction, especially if you’re looking for an LGBT thread.


Next is When It All Falls Down. Tanya Chris and I are writing buddies, even though she focuses on M/M romance and I’m strictly a YA/NA gal. (Goodness, so many abbreviations!) While still firmly in the romance genre, this is the most YA-ish of her books, so I was excited to give it a read. The premise is that Charlie is a high school senior who’s recently come out of the closet. His love interest, Drew, is reeling from a recent auto accident where he struck and killed a young girl. Both characters have a lot to deal with, their walls both self-imposed and terrifying real (a lawsuit with huge monetary implications, the possibility of having a college admissions decision revoked).

What I really liked about this book was the fleshed-out cast of characters. I was really feeling the chemistry between the two main characters (Drew is absolutely adorable!), and their family members and friends’ approach to Charlie and Drew’s developing relationship is handled in a realistic, grounded way that feels fresh. This mixed with the lawsuit details, which are incredibly real and well-researched, made this a fun, engrossing read.


Swipe Right for Murder consumed me for forty-eight hours, gobbling up every spare moment I had. I really enjoyed Milman’s first book, and I was a bit scared that this would be a sophomore slump effort, as it’s only been a year since his first novel. How wrong could I be—Swipe Right for Murder is a wild ride, set in 2019 but with a raucous, cyberpunk feel. I’ve been of the opinion for some time that, of all the fictional visions for the future, cyberpunk is the most accurate; give this book a read and see if you agree.

The premise is that Aidan, through the use of a Grindr-style hook-up app on his senior Spring Break, stumbles into an unfortunate series of events that lead him into close contact with a domestic terrorist organization bent on killing homophobes. This is a page-turner if there ever was one, and it’s fucking funny. Seriously, there are some legit laugh-out-loud moments in this book, which is hard to do with a written medium, in my opinion. The book is smart, hilarious, and turned up to eleven at all points. Count me in for all future releases from Milman; I’m a fan.


Have you read any great books with LGBT threads lately? Any favorites to recommend? Leave your suggestions down below!

Short Tuesday #11: “The World is Full of Monsters” by Jeff VanderMeer

This week I returned once more to Tor to look at another piece of short fiction. I was especially intrigued to read a story by Jeff VanderMeer, since he’s actually been on my radar for a while as one of the editors of The Weird. Side note that his wife, Ann VanderMeer, also edited The Weird, as well as some of the other Tor stories I’ve read for Short Tuesday thus far, plus edited this story as well, which adds a whole different layer of interesting. You can read the short story for free here…

I’ll be honest—I’m a bit flummoxed by this story! It documents one man’s interactions with an alien force that has engulfed the Earth; the narrative focuses more on the MC’s discovery of the world and the realization of what is happening than on any kind of plot. The aliens are of the parasitic variety, rather than laser gun toting sort, and the focus throughout is on the natural progression of the parasite—what happens to Earth’s flora and fauna, as well as how the parasite (called the “story-creature”) physically and mentally manifests itself in the MC.

And while I stood there in the shadows of the moonless night, beyond the street lamps, beyond the circling moths and with the nighthawks gliding silent overhead…while I stood there and pleaded, the story-creature sprouted out of the top of my skull in a riot of wildflowers, goldenrod, and coarse weeds.

There are many instances throughout where it’s difficult to get a sense of what’s happening, which adds to the story in my opinion. With a kind of Lovecraftian flair, the MC is presented with beings and creatures that don’t really make sense, and all he can do is relay what’s happening as best he can based on his human capacities. At the same time he is uncovering truths about himself; contact with the alien parasite has changed him in irreparable, unexpected ways.

I think this is the kind of story that really needs a few reads. The prose has such a driving momentum that you kind of can’t help reading onward, even as your brain is trying to parse what’s happening, so I felt like there was quite a lot I was missing. Even so, I like to think that there would be so many unknowns in the event of actual extraterrestrial contact that this story conveys that uncertain feeling exceedingly well. Who knows—maybe I’ll read through it again sometime and see how the story hits me a second time around.

When the Sky Fell on Splendor by Emily Henry

I’m a huge fan of Stranger Things, so was immediately intrigued by Emily Henry’s When the Sky Fell on Splendor, which is obviously referencing the TV show with the cover. The alien component as well was interesting, since I’ve heard multiple people in the YA publishing sphere mention how aliens just kind of aren’t a thing for some reason, even though vampires, werewolves, mermaids, and their ilk have all had a turn in the spotlight. I #amwriting an alien book right now (lol, how cringy can I make this post? 😀 ). Even though my book’s more New Adult than YA, anything new even tangentially related to aliens right now is interesting to me, even just from a market research standpoint.

So I was pumped to read this book… and then it fell a bit flat for me. Something about the prose wasn’t connecting with me—perhaps too many details and flashbacks (oh, the many flashbacks!) that distracted from the main action. There are also too many characters in the MC’s friend group; I’d have cut at least two or three of them out. I understand that Henry was trying to illustrate how the unfortunate history of their town had influenced everyone a bit differently, but it was too many people to keep track of; I had to frequently backtrack to figure out who everyone was again. If there had been fewer characters, perhaps we could have seen more depth with the character development. A smaller, more careful approach is pretty much always going to be better than a scattershot method.

Also…

Huge, ending ruining spoiler incoming…

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It turns out there aren’t even any aliens in this book. The cover’s basically a total lie; instead we discover that the entity the characters encountered in the beginning of the book is the soul of someone in the town. This fit with the navel gazey feel of the book, but I still felt a bit lied to as a reader. If I see an alien spacecraft on the cover, I want actually aliens, dammit. Don’t give me that huge tease, then only serve up misdirection. It was disappointing, rather than surprising. That was the point at which my three star review dropped down to two, since I felt it was kind of a betrayal of the audience.

So this is a sad pass for me, despite some fun moments throughout.